A Turkey Day Trio from TJ’s – and the price – WOW!

Fast facts:

  • 2018 Emma Reichart Dry Riesling, Rheinhessen, Germany ($4.99 @Trader Joe’s,  California)
  • 2017 Emma Reichart Rosé of Pinot Noir, Pfalz, Germany ($4.99 @Trader Joe’s,  California)
  • 2018 Emma Reichart Gewutrztraminer, Pfalz, Germany ($5.99 @Trader Joe’s,  California)
Three glasses and three bottles of wine
The Thanksgiving triple threat from “Emma Reichart” and Trader Joe’s

It might surprise most wine drinkers (especially those of us west of the Rockies) to learn that Germany is the fourth largest wine producer in Europe. For many consumers, for many years, German wines were a bit of a black box. The labels were undecipherable, hard to pronounce (take Gewurtztraminer, for example) and if you weren’t a student of German wine offerings, you weren’t sure if the wine you were buying would be sweet, off-dry or dry.

The importer of these three Emma Reichart wines seems to have addressed all of these issues with American-friendly wine labels and flavor profiles that mimic new world wines.  And with prices that are nothing short of extraordinary.

I would go so far as to say that several decades ago, German winemakers may not have been able to make wines like these three. But things have changed, not the least of which is the global climate. For all its negative effects, climate change can actually have positive effects in cool climate growing regions such as those in Germany.  Warmer temperatures (along with improvements in modern wine-making techniques) are yielding riper fruit, which begets higher sugar levels, which begets more balanced wines. Simply put: riper wines taste better, at least to the vast majority of wine drinkers.

What is remarkable about these three wines is how stylistically similar they are. All three were fruity, crisp and delicious, and all three would pair exceptionally well with traditional Thanksgiving fare.  (I am a big fan of Riesling and “Gewurtz” on the Thanksgiving table, just ask my family.)

Tasting notes:

Riesling:  

Fragrant citrus blossom notes mingle with apricot, meyer lemon and honeycomb in this dry Riesling.  The bright and citrusy style works well with “green” flavors such as lime, basil, tomatillo and jalapeno.  The vibrant minerality would pair well with seafood, chicken, salads, guacamole and other Asian cuisines. Did I mention traditional Thanksgiving dishes?

Rosé:

Elegant rose petal pink in the glass, this rosé has a nose of apricot, lime zest, floral, and faint grass clippings. Palate was bright citrus. apricot, and pear with nice acidity, slight minerality, and decent finish. Would pair very well with Indian, Chinese or Thai cuisines. And did I mention traditional Thanksgiving dishes?

Gewurtztraminer:

Delicate notes of lychee and rose petals open the nose of this “Gewurtz”.  The winemaker states this is “medium dry” in style (suggesting at least some residual sugar) but I think it leans heavily towards dry, like the Riesling.  It has nice fruit driven purity, is luxuriously juicy, balancing pink grapefruit with spice and honey.  The floral and spice notes bring out the best in a wide range of exotic flavors. Like its new world counterparts, the clove spice notes that are hinted to on the finish are part of the reason it pairs with spicy cuisines.  Or…traditional Thanksgiving dishes!

All three show best when served nicely chilled.

Map showing the wine regions of Germany
Map showing the wine regions of Germany. These three are from Pfalz and Rheinhessen. 

If you are hosting a big crew for Thanksgiving, this would be a good wine to stock up on by the case.  At $5 a bottle, what have you got to lose?

As always, let us know what you think about these selection by commenting here or on our Facebook page. If you have found a wine you think we should investigate, always feel free to post a photo on the Vinopointer.com Facebook page.

Cheers!

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